Summary Logical Framework

Narrative Summary Verifiable Indicators Means of Verification Assumptions/Risks/Remarks

Goal

Contribute to the reduction of poverty in Gwadar and Lasbela districts

  • % reduction in poverty levels in project districts
  • % reduction wastage of fish catch
  • No. of households with improvement in household assets and income
  • % increase in general hygiene, and reduction in child malnutrition
  • No. of merchants to whom fish is sold
  • Share of price paid to producer
  • Baseline survey
  • Poverty Score Cards
  • Surveys at completion
  • Fisheries Dept data

Political and economic stability and

Security.

Purpose

Increase incomes and enhance the

livelihoods of poor rural and Fisherman households in the project area

  • Number of households with increase in incomes
  • % of households graduate to higher bands as per poverty score card
  • approach
  • Poverty Score Cards
  • Household surveys at baseline & completion
No significant reduction is fish catch from disease or fish stocks in the project districts.

Outputs

Community development: community mobilization; enhanced capacity for sustainable livelihoods; enhanced capacity for employment and productive self-employment

Outcomes (RIMS 2nd Level) in italics

  • No. of COs/VOs formed or strengthened
  • No of COs operational/functional
  • No. of COs/VOs with women in leadership positions
  • No. of CO members accessing CO-managed financial services
  • No. of active borrowers for fisher folk related product
  • No of CO members received vocational training (gender disaggregated)
  • No of women receive poultry/ruminant packages
  • % of households with increased incomes and asset by PY6
  • NRSP progress reports
  • Participatory (social mobilization) monitoring reports
  • Progress reports
Social & cultural barriers that prevent the poor & women from participating in COs Coordinated & integrated delivery as per expressed needs of the poor Sufficient qualified staff available

Fisheries development:

Improved infrastructure; increased productivity, reduced wastage, strengthened local capacity

  • No. of landing sites improved/ constructed after 3 years
  • % of total amount allocated for landing sites utilized by the end of first, second and midterm review.
  • No of support facilities for landing sites developed after 3 years
  • No of participatory management teams established for landing sites and protocols developed
  • No of fishermen trained in better catch handling and sale
  • No of small boats refurbished/ provided with improved storage
  • No of fishermen adopt improve catch handling / hygiene
  • No. fishers with decrease the wastage rate
  • Fisheries management plan formulated
  • Plan for Landing site management by fishermen developed by midterm review.
  • Fishermen cooperatives./ representative bodies take full charge of landing sites during the last year of project.
  • Fisheries Department Reports
  • Fisheries Department data

Implementation as per planned Schedule Communities participate in entire cycle including O & M

Rural Infrastructure:

increased access between communities, fish landing sites and national highways ; enhanced access to basic services through CPIs

  • No & km of roads constructed/rehabilitated
  • 25% during the first two years and 40% of the total allocation for road component utilized by Mid Term review.
  • Rainwater harvesting systems constructed
  • No of communities and households connected
  • No of CPI schemes supported (by type)
  • % of CPI scheme with O&M mechanism
  • 50% of total allocation for CPIs utilized by midterm review.
  • C&W Progress reports
  • PMU reports
  • Community feedback, evaluations

Implementation as per planned schedule Communities participate in entire cycle including O&M

Project Management:

project efficiently managed, monitored

  • Timely recruitment of competent staff
  • Gender Ratio of PMU staff (% women)
  • Disbursement Rate according to schedule
  • Periodic reports, studies, workshops & other events
Project reports

Project staff are recruited on merit and retained for the duration of the project.

Activities

  1. Community development: community mobilization, asset creation, capacity building, technical & vocational training;
  2. Fisheries development: construction of landing sites and support facilities, Support to fishing communities, institutional capacity building & sustainable fisheries management, community managed financial services;
Organogram

Cost & Financing

The total Project costs over a 6-year implementation period, including physical and price contingencies, are estimated at PKR 3 billion (USD 35.2 million). The total baseline costs are USD 36.9 million, while price and physical contingencies account for USD 12.2 million.

The major investments are in;

  1. Community Development activities constituting 12% (USD 3.9 million) of base costs.
  2. Fisheries Development which represents  the  core  productive  project  which  takes  up  45%  (USD  14.9  million)  of  base  costs.
  3. Rural  Infrastructure  takes  up  37%  of  base  costs  (USD  12.2  million). Project Management is 7% of base costs.
IFAD will finance 85.1% of the Project costs (USD 30 million) through a loan to the Government of Pakistan on highly concessionary terms. The provincial government will provide counterpart contribution to the tune of USD 4.7 million by waiving/ foregoing duties and taxes accruing from Project transactions and other in-kind costs. The beneficiaries will contribute 0.5 million to the Project through in-kind contribution.
 

Target Population

Lasbela  has  an  estimated  population  of  4.2  million  while  Gwadar  has  a  population  of 2.5 million.  Poverty is estimated at over 60% in the two coastal districts.  In terms of Human Development Index for Pakistan, Lasbela is nationally ranked at 33rd and Gwadar at 78th. Lasbela’s relatively higher position is primarily because of the presence of Hub Industrial estate and relatively better indicators for a number of coastal towns.  Otherwise,  its  agriculture  hinterland  and  coastal fishermen  communities  are  as  poor  and  neglected  as  any  other  backward  area  of  the  country. Rural and urban poverty Incidence in the two districts is reflected in Table;

Table 2: Poverty Incidence In Project Area and Target HHs

District

Total House Hold

Overall Poor HHs

Rural HHs in 28 UCs

Target Poorest HHs

Lasbela

100%

     

Lasbela

56,110

37,257

39,934

13,813

 

Gwadar

100%

     

Gwadar

25,133

11,951

17,399

6,187

 

Total

81,243

49,208

57,333

20,000

 The project’s primary target group will be approximately 20,000 resource poor rural households in 26 rural Union Councils of Gwadar and Lasbela. They include small landowners, tenants, landless, small  fishermen  (either owning  small  boats  of  less  than  30  feet  and  working as  hired  hands  or “khalasis”) and women. The poverty profile of the target group is reflected in the following two tables:


Table 3: Profile of the Target Project Area

 

Population

 

District

Tehsils

Rural UCs

Villages

Men

Women

Total

Households

Gwadar

4

9

110

59,970

52,344

112,314

17,399

Lasbela

5

17

272

113,801

103,225

217,026

39,934

Total

9

26

382

173,771

155,569

329,340

57,333

Table 4: District Poverty Profile

 

LASBELA

GWADAR

TOTAL HHs

Poverty Ranking

%

 

%

 

Extremely Poor

20

2,763

20

1,237

4,000

Chronically Poor

30

4,144

30

1,856

6,000

Transitory Poor

30

4,144

30

1,856

6,000

Transitory vulnerable

20

2,763

20

1,237

4,000

Transitory Non-Poor; Non Poor

-

-

-

-

-

Total

 

13,813

 

6,187

 
 

Project Area

The factors that affect the rural poor in general are further exacerbated in marginal and remote areas where,  land productivity  is  lower, availability  of  inputs and access  to markets  is poor  to non-existent, cropping, horticultural and  livestock  raising  techniques are unimproved due  to  isolation and constraints imposed by arid or mountainous conditions. Balochistan is a fit case for all these factors. It is geographically the largest province (almost 44% of landmass) but least populated (5% of national population). It is also the most under-developed due to low population densities, poor communication infrastructure, historically low investments in human development, and politico-tribal strains. However, it is a province of immense mineral, agriculture and marine riches with huge development potential.

Balochistan’s  two  coastal  districts  of  Gwadar  and  Lasbela cover 760  km  of  the  1,100  km national coast line and have access to some of the richest fishing grounds containing tuna, mackerel, sardines, herrings, shrimps, squids and crabs. However, Balochistan contributes only one sixth of the national fisheries value added. The main reasons are low productivity along the entire value chain, policy/regulatory issues, lack of access to knowledge /capital /technology and poor supportive infrastructure ( jetties/landing sites, auction halls, ice availability and manipulated buyers market ). Most of the fishing fleet consists of small and dilapidated boats with limited endurance and capacity unable to reach richer fishing grounds. About 20% of the boats have deep sea fishing capacity.  Low knowledge and awareness and abysmal  onboard  cold  storage  facilities  coupled  with poor/inappropriate  fishing  gear  results  in  high  wastage  (in  the  range  of 20%  to 50%).  A well entrenched informal and usurious financing system has many fishermen captive forcing them to sell their catch at lower prices to the lender (‘Mole System’). Harbour and auction halls are either missing or poorly operated and fail international health and safety standards. There are around 22 processing units  in  the  region  but mostly  purchase  catch  at  rock-bottom  rates, lack modern  preservation  and packaging techniques and export to low end markets.

 

 

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